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West Country Galleries Photography is a subsidiary of West Country Galleries Ltd.

www.westcountrygalleries.co.uk 

West Country Galleries Photography
Plain wall specialist

“If you see something that moves you, and then snap it, you keep a moment.”
– Linda McCartney

Address:

Hilary Osman - Photographer

West Country Galleries Photography

Phone/Email:

Telephone: +44 (0)1934-823374

Email: hilary@westcountrygalleries.co.uk

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Banwell from a different perspective

Banwell in abstract is where I am trying to get my camera to pull away an object from its surroundings.

 

Scrolling through the catalogue of images there is a composition entitled Bleak House - Boarded Up of a derelict window adorning a rotting wood frame, fractured glass and a display of cluttered torn boxes throw into the mix. The subject is not difficult to fathom, in fact the viewer knows what it is but the abstraction has drilled into a further aspect of the objects existence that was not brought to the forefront before. Something not noticed has now been magnified and introduced to us by the focus of the lens.

There were a few things that caught my eye about many of the subjects I chose to feature here. Take for example the image entitled The Burning Bush.

  • The subject itself stands out because it is so eye catching.

  • It appears to be peering at you from the wall begging to be `snapped up`

  • The colour explodes onto the scene with a dominant splash against a broad backdrop of greens.

  • Bright colours such as yellow and red can provide an effective point of focus, drawing the eye. This is especially true when the area is limited and contrasts so greatly with the rest of the image.

  • Shadows that have been captured in my photography can provide a great subject matter. Our eyes seem to avert the gaze of the shadow because our brain will not acknowledge their presence and filters them from our perspective. Fascinating fact is that shadows are only made obvious when we have taken the image and look at it for the first time.